Thursday, December 1, 2022

How can you save money despite power guzzlers?

by admin
0 comment

This is a paid post brought to you by Do it + Garden

The energy situation for the coming winter is likely to be less comfortable than we are used to. Bottlenecks are imminent, in the worst case the government could even pull the plug on us with restrictions. In addition, we can expect steep price increases next year – we feel the (wasted) energy consumed in our wallets more than ever.

It is therefore worth taking a closer look at our consumption. According to the Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), we need a particularly large amount of electricity over the year for lighting (13 percent), cooking (11 percent), the refrigerator (10 percent) and for tumble dryers, consumer electronics and the dishwasher (9 percent each). The washing machine has a share of 8 percent.

The kilowatt-hour check (see box) shows which device actually consumes how much. This shows that with the same energy that is needed for a quick warm shower, you can charge your cell phone 100 times or bake a pizza twice. If you want to know exactly, you can install an ammeter.

1 kilowatt hour of electricity is enough for …

  • Run the dishwasher twice (Eco program)
  • Bake two pizzas with convection
  • Boil 70 cups of coffee
  • Blow dry hair for 1 hour
  • Take a warm shower for 2 minutes and 30 seconds
  • Charge the phone 100 times
  • Wash once at 60 degrees
  • Tumbled laundry almost once
  • Watch TV for 7 hours
  • Run the dishwasher twice (Eco program)
  • Bake two pizzas with convection
  • Boil 70 cups of coffee
  • Blow dry hair for 1 hour
  • Take a warm shower for 2 minutes and 30 seconds
  • Charge the phone 100 times
  • Wash once at 60 degrees
  • Tumbled laundry almost once
  • Watch TV for 7 hours

How easy and how much we can now save on a normal day from the morning toilet to the dinner wash in the household is shown in the log of our fictitious average Swiss man Daniel (42). He is an accountant, single and works from home three times a week. Its average consumption as a one-person household in an apartment building is around 1800 kWh per year. (For comparison: According to the SFOE, a two-person household uses 2750 kWh, a four-person household uses 3850 kWh.)

7 a.m.: Breakfast

Nothing works without coffee at Daniel’s. In the morning he needs two cups. He still uses his old fully automatic machine for this, which, however, consumes a lot of electricity when it is not in use because it is on standby. New, energy-efficient coffee machines have an automatic switch-off function that saves a whopping 60 percent of electricity. Important: When purchasing, select at least energy efficiency class A+ according to the energy label.

Daniel spreads two sandwiches with his coffee. The butter from the 5 °C refrigerator does not spread immediately, which is a sign that the refrigerator is set too cold. According to experts, 7 °C is sufficient for most foods. Two degrees less cool reduces power consumption by no less than 12 percent. Daniel’s refrigerator also wastes electricity unnecessarily because of various icy patches. These increase power consumption by up to 15 percent. This is where defrosting the fridge and freezer twice a year helps.

7:30 a.m.: Morning toilet

Off to the shower. Daniel does a lot of things right here. Taking a shower uses a lot less energy than taking a bath in the tub: 15 liters per minute (Daniel takes a 5-minute shower, that’s 75 liters), a full bath needs 120 to 150 liters. But Daniel could get even more out of it: if he stood under the shower for just three minutes instead of five, a good 30 liters of water could be saved. The optimum is the economy shower head. This means that only 6 instead of 15 liters of water flow through the pipe per minute. Other tips: Turn off the water when soaping and shampooing and only shower warm instead of hot. Another tip would be not to shower one day a week (e.g. when working from home).

Tips and free video expertise

Do it + Garden simply explains how electricity can be saved and is there for you if you have any questions – with competent advice, a lot of specialist knowledge and comprehensive product knowledge. Advice in the branch and online is free! Also use the tips on the website.

Do it + Garden simply explains how electricity can be saved and is there for you if you have any questions – with competent advice, a lot of specialist knowledge and comprehensive product knowledge. Advice in the branch and online is free! Also use the tips on the website.

8 a.m.: home office

It’s a cloudy day, so Daniel leaves the lights on in the whole apartment, although he spends almost all of his time in his office until lunch. Consistently turning off the lights in rooms that are not in use has a not inconsiderable saving effect. If you like it comfortable, you can afford a motion detector. It would also make sense for Daniel to convert all light sources to LEDs, which would save no less than 80 percent of the energy. The accountant, on the other hand, does a lot right when it comes to heating. He has decided to lower the room temperature by one degree permanently.

Tip: You can find out more about saving on light and heating here – also why sealing windows is important.

10 a.m.: washing

During a short break, Daniel starts a washing drum. The most important rule here: only turn on the washing machine when it is sufficiently full. If it is only half full, it uses more water than necessary. In most cases, a temperature of 30 to a maximum of 40 degrees is sufficient. Newer models have economy or eco programs: These usually run longer but use less water.

Because it’s no longer warm enough outside and also rather damp, Daniel dries the clothes in the tumble dryer. Here, too, it is important to fill the drum well, so fewer passes are necessary over the course of a year. In the warm season, it is definitely worth hanging out to dry in the fresh air on a line whenever possible.

12 p.m.: Lunch

Since Corona, Daniel has got used to cooking more and more himself. However, he is not familiar with all energy-saving tricks. For example, the simplest of all tips: Put the lid on the pot and you can save a third of the energy. Glass lids are particularly good. So you always have an eye on the food and don’t have to open the pot every time, which also wastes energy.

After the meal, Daniel decides to put the leftovers in the fridge for the next day. He empties it from the still warm pan into a Tupperware and puts it in the fridge. From an energy-saving point of view, however, it would be better to first let the food cool down at room temperature or on the windowsill so that the refrigerator does not need additional energy to cool down the leftovers.

Tip for the faucet: This is where so-called aerators help to save water.

How big are the savings?

  1. Use LEDs: Energy saving of 80 percent or 10 francs per lamp per year compared to incandescent lamps.
  2. Avoid standby: Switch off the TV, set-top box, PC and modem completely after use – thanks to safety edges. By avoiding standby consumption, you can save approx. 100 francs save per year.
  3. Fridge 7 °C instead of 5 °C: This saving is around 10 francs.
  4. Lid on the pan: This simple tip is 23 francs worth per year.
  5. Switch off the coffee machine: Avoid standby gives up to 16 francs per year.
  6. Showering instead of bathing: The savings are up to 250 francs per year and person.
  7. Lower living temperature: Setting the heating one degree lower results in savings of 6 percent – ​​or up to the equivalent 115 francs yearly.
  8. Dry laundry outside: If you do this at least in the warmer half of the year, you can save up to 35 francs.

Source: EWZ

  1. Use LEDs: Energy saving of 80 percent or 10 francs per lamp per year compared to incandescent lamps.
  2. Avoid standby: Switch off the TV, set-top box, PC and modem completely after use – thanks to safety edges. By avoiding standby consumption, you can save approx. 100 francs save per year.
  3. Fridge 7 °C instead of 5 °C: This saving is around 10 francs.
  4. Lid on the pan: This simple tip is 23 francs worth per year.
  5. Switch off the coffee machine: Avoid standby gives up to 16 francs per year.
  6. Showering instead of bathing: The savings are up to 250 francs per year and person.
  7. Lower living temperature: Setting the heating one degree lower results in savings of 6 percent – ​​or up to the equivalent 115 francs yearly.
  8. Dry laundry outside: If you do this at least in the warmer half of the year, you can save up to 35 francs.

Source: EWZ

3 p.m.: Tea break

Daniel always drinks his tea at 3 p.m. For this he boils water in the pan. There is always something left over, he throws it away. The kettle would be more energy-efficient – ​​especially if only as much water is heated as is required for the tea.

5 p.m.: Christmas lights

It suddenly gets light on the balcony in front of Daniel’s living room window. The Christmas lights have switched on. Daniel has been using this traditional string of lights on the balcony railing for years and has installed a timer that ensures the installation turns off again at 11pm when he goes to bed. It would be even better when it comes to saving electricity, however, to rely on LEDs and the aforementioned large savings potential. An example: LED Christmas lights that shine for 6 hours a day for a month (i.e. a total of 180 hours) consume no more electricity than drying hair for 22 minutes. Good to know: LED Christmas lights are available for indoor and outdoor use.

6 p.m.: Closing time

Around 6 p.m. Daniel leaves his home office. So that it is not so quiet in the apartment, he turns on the TV without actually looking. Instead, he folds the washed clothes and does other household chores. He also leaves the computer running after work, because he wants to check again later whether an Excel list he needs for the next day has arrived. The PC is also on standby overnight because Daniel is too lazy to restart the computer every day. However, you can save a lot by consistently switching off. A socket strip with a switch is ideal so that all devices used in the office can be switched off conveniently at once.

7 p.m.: Dinner

Daniel is hungry. Not wanting to eat the leftovers from lunch or cook anything new, he decides to put a frozen pizza in the oven. He preheats the oven. But that’s actually not necessary at all: modern devices get hot so quickly that preheating isn’t worth it – that saves 20 percent. It is also important to consistently use convection when baking, so you can save another 15 percent of energy per pizza party. Another tip: switch off the temperature 5 minutes before the end of baking, it is still sufficient to make the pizza crispy. Also: Don’t open the door too often to look inside. Around 20 percent of the energy is lost each time.

7:30 p.m.: Washing up

Something Daniel has learned: Always fill the washing-up machine well before running it, which means that he does not use it every day. But for rinsing, he always relies on the normal program. It would be better with the Eco function, because in the normal program the machine needs almost twice as much electricity because the water has to be heated faster and more intensely.

8:15 p.m.: Netflix evening

After running for about two and a half hours just as a background program, Daniels TV is now planning to catch a few episodes of his favorite series on Netflix. However, it would be better to concentrate on the targeted use of the device. In addition, the same applies as with the PC in the office: switch it off completely after use! Otherwise, the television will continue to consume electricity even when it is in standby.

Presented by a partner

This post was created by the Ringier Brand Studio on behalf of a client. The content is journalistically prepared and meets Ringier’s quality requirements.

Contact: Email Brand Studio

This post was created by the Ringier Brand Studio on behalf of a client. The content is journalistically prepared and meets Ringier’s quality requirements.

Contact: Email Brand Studio

Related News

Latest Switzerland News and updates and political news, follow our daily update about the congress and the government roundup, we also provide the latest news from all over the world minute by minute, subscribe to get the latest updates directly to your inbox.

© 2022 All Right Reserved. Switzerland Times